Question: What Are The Pros Of Being An Architect?

Are architects rich?

Architects have a lot of the skills necessary to earn good money as a real estate developer.

They often don’t realize it, or they think it’s not for them – it is only reserved for rich and large investors.

This is definitely the case when you work for a real estate developer..

Is becoming an architect hard?

BUT if this is overly important to you, then you maybe shouldn’t be an architect. The inglorious moments of working long and hard, being challenged by contractors, plans examiners, and difficult clients, will far outnumber the moments when you look cool for being an Architect.

How many hours architects work?

Full-time: Most work full-time (81%, much higher than the average of 66%). Hours: Full-time workers spend around 45 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours). Age: The average age is 39 years (compared to the average of 40 years).

Do architects travel a lot?

So yes, you can do quite a bit of traveling as an architect depending on who you work for, who your clients are, and where they are building. … Travel for work is very different from the romantic idea of travel.

Are architects attractive?

Architects voted sexiest professionals Originally surfacing in 2005, a survey conducted by online dating gurus ‘Drawing Down the Moon’ has shown that architects top the poll for the professionals that we find sexiest, beating doctors, teachers and fire-fighters to the punch.

What are the cons of being an architect?

Disadvantages:The process of becoming an architect is long, competitive, and expensive. … Starting salaries for architects are considered lower than average when compared with other professional careers with similar requirements, such as medicine and law.

What skills do architects need?

Skills and knowledgedesign skills and knowledge.knowledge of building and construction.to be thorough and pay attention to detail.thinking and reasoning skills.customer service skills.excellent verbal communication skills.analytical thinking skills.the ability to use your initiative.More items…

What are the benefits of studying architecture?

7 wonderful benefits of a career in ArchitectureInteresting and creative work. … The field attracts passionate and like-minded people. … It’s a fascinating, fast-paced career. … Greater appreciation and understanding of the cities and buildings around you. … You can make an impact on the city and people around you. … Respected career. … There’s an emphasis on travel.

What qualities make a good architect?

10 Personality Traits You Need to Become an ArchitectYou love projects of all kinds. … You have preferences … … You stink at math … but don’t care. … You have as much passion for people as you do for buildings. … You have as much passion for environments as you do for people. … You can be both a Generalist and a Specialist. … You actively design everything.More items…

Are architects happy?

Architects are about average in terms of happiness. As it turns out, architects rate their career happiness 3.1 out of 5 stars which puts them in the bottom 41% of careers. …

Are architects smart?

The general consensus is that architects are intelligent, honorable, stylish (e.g. wear a lot of black) creative types … the plus side of being an artist without the “starving” precursor.

Can an architect make millions?

Most architects spend years in school, go through an internship and earn far less. And yet what we do as architects is just as needed. The average salary of a sole proprietor in the US is $70,000 according to recent surveys. … The good news is, making a great income IS possible for an architect.

Do architects use math?

Architects use mathematics for several reasons, leaving aside the necessary use of mathematics in the engineering of buildings. Firstly, they use geometry because it defines the spatial form of a building. … Thirdly, they may use mathematical objects such as tessellations to decorate buildings.

Are architects well respected?

The architect who lives down the street is generally respected – not as much as a doctor (we maybe fetishise health professionals a bit) but certainly as much as an engineer or a chartered accountant.